Thursday, June 21, 2012

TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER..... DESIGNER...



TINKER:  an itinerant tinsmith and mender of household utensils made out of tin

TAILOR: is a person who makes, repairs or alters clothing professionally, especially suits and men's clothing

SOLDIER: a member of the local land component of national armed forces 

DESIGNER: a person who designs. More formally, a designer is an agent that specifies the structural properties of a design object. In practice, anyone who creates tangible or intangible objects, such as consumer products, processes, laws, games and graphics is referred to as a designer 





Each profession, a value to society. But why the definitions you ask?

Well I think it's important to keep the line drawn in the sand and make sure we can see which side of the line designates which professions have more value. Don't you agree?



There is often discussion on SM sites and on TV design / decor shows regarding the distinction between a designer and a decorator.  The above definition of a designer is very broad and may include anyone from a video game designer to a custom pillow cover designer....in fact, I'm going to include a DIYer.  The definition for Decorator, however is very clear....they design the interiors of clients' homes, speccing furniture, finishes and accessories.  So why the confusion, why the discussion? The confusion for many people is when you preface the word designer with the word interior....hence Interior Designer.

Now, I'm not about to go on some diatribe about the pros and cons, number of years at school,  obtaining a degrees vs a certificate....I also assume there are different standards and requirements in the US as well.....if you're interested, you can look it up yourself. NOT what this post is about and for the purpose of this post I'm referring to Residential as opposed to Commercial design.

I am a Residential Interior Decorator by training,  but by definition, I am also a Designer...however, I may not, legally in Canada, refer to myself as a Residential Interior Designer ...and I don't.  NCIDQ has some fairly rigorous requirements to have the designation of Interior Designer bestowed upon you.

...are we really talking apples vs. oranges here?



In some cases yes, but the modern day Residential Interior Decorator / Designer each has expertise in their chosen field and often the expertise overlaps. I am finding due to SM that the line drawn in the sand is becoming fainter ...we are sharing ever-evolving, new found information, learning from each other. Expanding our knowledge base to the betterment of our industry ... and the client, who after all is the ultimate beneficiary.

Unfortunately, I have also seen the negative side of SM bashes, where some designers openly criticize, demean and are disrespectful to other designers.  I cannot fathom why?  As far as I'm concerned, it serves no purpose other than to insight more negative feedback....it does NOTHING positive to promote the design industry or indeed,  the bad-mouthing designer.
Are we all equally fantastic designers? Not a chance. Some of us have the design bug, go to school, are  accredited and become successful, recognized designers.  Others of us have the design bug, don't go to school, apprentice or work our butts off and become successful, recognized designers. Beyond this, however, we ARE indeed comparing apples to oranges. The two things that distinguish a good designer from a great designer regardless of the route chosen, is TALENT and PASSION ...because all the keen interest, homework, hours spent on the job and credentials amount to nothing but a hill of beans if you have not got TALENT and PASSION.

I'm going out on a limb here, but I'm thinking 'Bob', the original wheel designer from around the 8th millennium, had some major talent, passion and of course the enormous need to move heavy stuff from A to B. He was known back then as "the mesolithic guy of invention".

But, let's face it folks....the wheel has already been invented. Our job as designers is to reinterpret, rework, reimagine...redesign the wheel...take it to a different status.  The only way to achieve this is to utilize the various talent, passion and expertise of ALL designers.

And may I suggest, that we ALWAYS endeavour to show our respect to the global design community.



14 Comments:

At June 21, 2012 at 6:53 PM , Blogger Sarah Gunn said...

Great post! I would never call myself an interior designer, or any other title that is a result of very specific educational training {however, I can't always prevent others from doing so}. That said, the lines are blurring and I think it is so, so important to support others in the design industry, whatever their title/designation. Do we have to like what everyone else is doing, maybe not. But we should respect it.

 
At June 21, 2012 at 7:02 PM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

EXACTLY Sarah!.. and i know you wouldn't, but you could call yourself a DIY Designer for sure.

 
At June 21, 2012 at 7:13 PM , OpenID carolstandil said...

Well said, Maureen! (BTW -- just got my piece of paper the other day -- certified residential decorator!):-)

 
At June 21, 2012 at 7:35 PM , Blogger TLC_Designs said...

Well said, Maureen :) There is no room for negativity in the design industry, it's a cut-throat industry at the best of times (even if you move away and leave all the drama behind...it follows!) and playing into that is just beyond childish. DEsigners, decorators, graphic designers, artists, industrial designers, colour specialists, staging consultants...we're all trying to do the same thing more or less - make life more enjoyable and beautiful...and functional :) We should stick together!
*Tania @ Passport2Design.com

 
At June 21, 2012 at 8:10 PM , Blogger Solace Interiors said...

Make the world a prettier, more interesting, and for me, more organized space. Just do it and cut the drama...

Amen Maureen, amen.

 
At June 21, 2012 at 9:05 PM , Blogger Donna @ dh designs said...

Extremely well put Maureen! If we respect each other, support each other and inspire each other - WE ALL WIN!

 
At June 21, 2012 at 10:20 PM , Blogger Kelly @ JAX does design said...

The only thing being negative and petty accomplishes is making the negative & petty person look foolish. There's no reason or excuse for that kind of behaviour. Whether we're designers or decorators, we all have the desire and passion to create beautiful spaces that make our clients happy. Why bring ugly into a world that's all about pretty?

As for re-inventing the wheel - the foundation of what we do is already there, we just put our own personal spin on it. There's nothing wrong with taking an idea and making it our own. That's what makes this business so interesting, seeing how other decorators & designers interpret design.

Great post, Maureen :-)

 
At June 21, 2012 at 11:06 PM , Blogger Marilyn Russell said...

Great Post Maureen. THanks for sharing on FB this late in the evening. The negativity among designers/decorators is pure foolishnish. We're all doing the same thing and have the same goal in mind and we ALL have different visions as to how we design a space. The drama is rubbish I say rubbish.

 
At June 22, 2012 at 9:56 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

Thank you Carol ....and CONGRATULATIONS....on your mark...get set...start decorating!!

 
At June 22, 2012 at 9:57 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

hear hear Tania. Thank you for popping by and leaving a comment . I really appreciate it!

 
At June 22, 2012 at 9:58 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

yepper Nicole.

 
At June 22, 2012 at 10:01 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

yes we do Donna..there are no losers when any community visably shows respect. We don't all have to agree, creative /positive discourse should always be encouraged ...as witnessed by the TBBs.

 
At June 22, 2012 at 10:02 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

totally agree Kelly...thinking outside the box...making it better, more functional, greener etc.

 
At June 22, 2012 at 10:06 AM , Blogger Maureen @ Modecor said...

thank YOU for popping by Marilyn and leaving a comment...so appreciated. To add to what you've said, there's a need and room for many visions. Design/decor is not a Science...the principals of design should be adhered to, but within those parameters....so much is possible.

 

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Maureen at Modecor Muses: TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER..... DESIGNER...

TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER..... DESIGNER...



TINKER:  an itinerant tinsmith and mender of household utensils made out of tin

TAILOR: is a person who makes, repairs or alters clothing professionally, especially suits and men's clothing

SOLDIER: a member of the local land component of national armed forces 

DESIGNER: a person who designs. More formally, a designer is an agent that specifies the structural properties of a design object. In practice, anyone who creates tangible or intangible objects, such as consumer products, processes, laws, games and graphics is referred to as a designer 


DECORATOR: also called interior designer a person whose profession is the planning of the decoration and furnishings of interiors of houses, shops, etc

2. a person whose job is to design the interior of someone's home, by choosing colours, carpets, materials and furnishing




Each profession, a value to society. But why the definitions you ask?

Well I think it's important to keep the line drawn in the sand and make sure we can see which side of the line designates which professions have more value. Don't you agree?



There is often discussion on SM sites and on TV design / decor shows regarding the distinction between a designer and a decorator.  The above definition of a designer is very broad and may include anyone from a video game designer to a custom pillow cover designer....in fact, I'm going to include a DIYer.  The definition for Decorator, however is very clear....they design the interiors of clients' homes, speccing furniture, finishes and accessories.  So why the confusion, why the discussion? The confusion for many people is when you preface the word designer with the word interior....hence Interior Designer.

Now, I'm not about to go on some diatribe about the pros and cons, number of years at school,  obtaining a degrees vs a certificate....I also assume there are different standards and requirements in the US as well.....if you're interested, you can look it up yourself. NOT what this post is about and for the purpose of this post I'm referring to Residential as opposed to Commercial design.

I am a Residential Interior Decorator by training,  but by definition, I am also a Designer...however, I may not, legally in Canada, refer to myself as a Residential Interior Designer ...and I don't.  NCIDQ has some fairly rigorous requirements to have the designation of Interior Designer bestowed upon you.

...are we really talking apples vs. oranges here?



In some cases yes, but the modern day Residential Interior Decorator / Designer each has expertise in their chosen field and often the expertise overlaps. I am finding due to SM that the line drawn in the sand is becoming fainter ...we are sharing ever-evolving, new found information, learning from each other. Expanding our knowledge base to the betterment of our industry ... and the client, who after all is the ultimate beneficiary.

Unfortunately, I have also seen the negative side of SM bashes, where some designers openly criticize, demean and are disrespectful to other designers.  I cannot fathom why?  As far as I'm concerned, it serves no purpose other than to insight more negative feedback....it does NOTHING positive to promote the design industry or indeed,  the bad-mouthing designer.
Are we all equally fantastic designers? Not a chance. Some of us have the design bug, go to school, are  accredited and become successful, recognized designers.  Others of us have the design bug, don't go to school, apprentice or work our butts off and become successful, recognized designers. Beyond this, however, we ARE indeed comparing apples to oranges. The two things that distinguish a good designer from a great designer regardless of the route chosen, is TALENT and PASSION ...because all the keen interest, homework, hours spent on the job and credentials amount to nothing but a hill of beans if you have not got TALENT and PASSION.

I'm going out on a limb here, but I'm thinking 'Bob', the original wheel designer from around the 8th millennium, had some major talent, passion and of course the enormous need to move heavy stuff from A to B. He was known back then as "the mesolithic guy of invention".

But, let's face it folks....the wheel has already been invented. Our job as designers is to reinterpret, rework, reimagine...redesign the wheel...take it to a different status.  The only way to achieve this is to utilize the various talent, passion and expertise of ALL designers.

And may I suggest, that we ALWAYS endeavour to show our respect to the global design community.